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Meetup Booklet

Follow along with our meetup by downloading this booklet.
This is where you’ll find our Community Guidelines, and Maria P. P. Root’s Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage and Multiracial Oath of Responsibility. We lean on this language as a pillar to create safe spaces for critical conversation. If you want to come extra prepared, take a look at our meetup vocabulary list at the end and explore how you would define each term.

Meetup Discussion

This month The Mixed Space is partnering with two powerful Indigenous women to discuss native values and ways of life. We are focusing on the positive work and advocacy that each of them do in their own tribes, revitalizing traditions and uplifting their communities.
The preservation of Indigenous ancestry is vital not only to the cultural survival of Indigenous communities, but also to all inhabitants of this planet. In these times of climate crisis, how can we emulate a way of life that protects the planet? Living in harmony with nature is reflected by most Indigenous tribes, who recognize land does not belong to humanity.
Join us in making space for leaders and visionaries to share their wisdom and together we can expand this awareness beyond the meetup.
DID YOU KNOW?
An innumerable amount of tribes are not federally recognized, affecting tens of thousands of Indigenous community members. The U.S. government officially recognizes 574 tribes.
The Iroquois Confederacy or “Great Law of Peace” by Haudenosaunee/Six Nations was the original founder of the democratic principles which the 13 colonies and US Constitution modeled itself after.
In the late 1700s, Lenape Wikëwam peoples captured and adopted many English white settlers, of which very few could be persuaded to leave.
Indigenous Peoples is an umbrella term encompassing a wide variety of languages, cultures and experiences from regions all over the world; most people prefer to be referred to by their specific nations.


The Mixed Space is Proud to Present...

Carla Marie Munoz

Carla Marie Munoz is a Tribal Councilwoman of the Costanoan Rumsen Carmel Tribe. Serving as a tribal liaison for her people for the past nine years. Creating relationships between state parks, government agencies, and other tribal communities. She is focused on creating space for ceremonies, land restorations, as well as tribal recognition. Dedicated to working with tribal youth to restore traditional knowledge and bring tangible culture. Singing alongside her grandfather Chief Tony Cerda for the past 23 years, as well as partnering with her Ohlone Sister to share their cultural heritage. Now working as an artist using shells to make contemporary jewelry and oil paintings.

Darvette Lefthand

Indigenous activist and model Darvette Lefthand is a member of the Stoney Nakoda Sioux Nation and comes from Morley, a First Nations settlement, in Alberta, Canada. Living on the reservation had its share of struggles and hardships, but Darvette found her place among family and community members where she learned traditional knowledge, medicines, teachings, and cultural survival. She continues to learn more about traditional knowledge as well as to relearn the Stoney Nakoda language. With her colleagues, Darvette is a part of a grassroots movement dedicated to stopping drug dealers from selling hard drugs in the Stoney Nakoda Reserve. Above all, Darvette campaigns for Indigenous and human rights.

Topics of Conversation

Revitalization of traditions, tribal recognition, and cultural survival
Relationship to the land and sustainable ways of life
Raising the next generation of millennial Indigenous activists and our planet’s future

The Plastic Genocide

Harnessing Fire in Ceremonial Spaces

Land Back, Water Back, Culture Back, Everything Back

Join our Monthly Meetup

TUESDAY
November 16, 2021
at 7 - 9 p.m. EST
on Zoom

    * Limited availability         * Complimentary Event